Re-Thinking

➢ Bias and Executive Decisions

What do the financial Crisis of 2007, New York’s inability to recover from Hurricane Sandy in 2012, and Japan’s apparent lack of preparedness for the 2011 tsunami have in common? In each case, poor decisions were made because of personal bias, often by large groups of people, which caused inaccurate assessment of situations and facts, with devastating results. Personal bias comes from...

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➢ Recruiting and the Spouse

  Recruiting – Dinner with the candidate’s spouse and surprises If there are going to be surprises in the recruiting process, let them be early.  Dinner with the spouse, like reference checking, tends to be at the very end of the process, and surprises at the end may mean we have wasted significant resources and time for nothing.  References should be checked as soon as you have...

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➢ Fair Use of Social Media in Recruiting

Evaluating Facebook pages, personal Tweets and Linkedin are now part of our standard candidate evaluation procedure, and yes we have eliminated candidates from consideration based on what we saw there.  Social media sites are a meaningful reference point in developing a complete picture of a candidate.   They give us a feel for the candidate at home, and who he or she is off the job.  It gives...

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➢ Executive Retention – Missing Links

In drafting position descriptions, companies generally do a good job of laying out competencies, work experiences and education requirements. And too often, that’s where it stops. Selling the company story, it’s values and culture, outlining executive engagement strategy, mentoring and on boarding policies, and promoting the position in a way that will attract best talent is left up to...

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➢ Two Reasons the Super Bright Don’t Succeed

Why aren’t America’s C suites peopled with Mensa members?  According to a Hay Group study, most super bright people do not succeed.  Even the cleverest do not succeed in great numbers.  Why? The first reason has to do with the liabilities that come with superior intellect.  The super bright think faster than everyone around them, so tend to be intolerant and impatient.  They...

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➢ Kill Performance Appraisals

We have long been fans of David Rock’s work on managing with the brain in mind.  We think of ourselves as sophisticated creatures, but we are still animals with certain hard wiring in the brain to keep us from harm.  And we process information in order of need hierarchy.  It goes as follows:  First, avoid the predator, next find shelter, then food, and so on down the line. Food and shelter...

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➢ Selling the Client Opportunity

Search clients would do well to assess how well a search firm represents their company and sells the opportunity they are entrusted with.  Potential candidate judgments will be made and action or inaction determined based on the first message left by the recruiter, so presentations need to be carefully crafted.

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➢ When Can You Trust Your Gut?

Intuition is a powerful affirmation or warning system, and one we have come to trust and with good reason.  There is evidence that intuition is adequate sometimes, but under other circumstances, can actually encourage poor decisions.  Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman and psychologist Gary Klein debate the power and perils of intuition for senior executives.

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➢ Interviewing Talent – 10 Tips

Recent client experience compelled me to put together the following tips to help with interviewing. There might be an idea or two here you can use. Consider these 10 points in evaluating talent:

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➢ The Power of Personal Warmth

Here is a deceivingly simple concept to keep in mind when hiring executives. It’s one I have never seen discussed elsewhere, but “personal warmth” is a critical leadership skill, one of the most powerful, and it has been on our scorecards for 20 years.

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